Talk To Frank resources-for-family

About Talk To Frank

The campaign against drugs that has the longest duration in the entire UK is Talk to Frank. Though, has the campaign stopped anybody from using any drugs?

A decade ago a police SWAT team slammed into a peaceful kitchen somewhere in the suburbs and modified the image of drugs education in the United Kingdom for always. Cautions of how drugs could cause you to become disturbed and impassioned calls to say no to the menacing pushers skulking in every single playground disappeared. Instead, wit and fun including games were embraced.


In the first advertisement a teenager phoned a police team to detain his mother when she proposed that they had a peaceful discussion regarding drugs. But the new information being passed is "Drugs are illegal. Talking about them isn't. So, Talk to Frank."


Frank A Pleasant Private Drug Counsel

Devised by the advertising agency, Mother, Frank was actually the National Drugs Helpline brand new name. The idea was to build a reliable "older brother" image that could provide advice to teenagers about banned substances. To become a familiar brand with youth in the UK, the Frank label has presented everything from the adventures of pablo the drug mule to a tour of a brain warehouse.


According to the creative director, Justin Tindall, of the advertising agency, Leo Burnett, it was important that Frank was at no time seen in the flesh so that he could never be the victim of ridicule for wearing the incorrect shoes or attempting to be "down with the kids". Even the sham Frank videos on YouTube are moderately deferential. There's also no indication that Frank is working for the government, which is unusual for a government funded campaign.

Education about drug has come a long way since Nancy Reagan and the UK cast of Grange Hill told kids to "Just Say No," which a lot of people not believe was completely counterproductive.


Frank has set the standard, and now most adverts in Europe are using the same format to equip the youth with unbiased facts to help in making their choices. In nations with solid punishments for ownership, pictures of jail bars and disgraced guardians are still typical. You play, you pay. is the ad used to warn young people going for night clubbing in Singapore.

In the United States of America, the federal government has spent millions of dollars on a long-running campaign, Above the Influence, that sells positive possibilities to using substances by making use of a combination of funny and cautionary stories. The focus of the campaign is to talk to the youth in a language they understand, like the one ad showing a group of "stoners" stranded on a coach. But the drug fuelled descent into hell and scare tactics are still used by a surprisingly large number of campaigns around the world. One example is one of the DrugsNot4Me series in Canada that revealed how a very pretty confident woman slipped into deep-eyed wreck because of drugs.

Research that was done on a UK anti-drug campaign between 1999 and 2004 shows that describing the negative effects of abuse will often actually encourage young people "on the margins of society" to use drugs.


Frank broke new ground and was abundantly critiqued by opposed Conservative politicians at the while for setting out to propose that drugs may offer highs in addition to lows.


An early ad posted online told viewers, "Cocaine makes you feel on top of the world."

It wasn't at all times simple to balance the message correctly. Matt Powell, the man behind the cocaine advertisement and then creative director of the digital agency, Profero, currently thinks he formed a too favourable estimate of the attention span of the typical person who browses the Internet. The negative effects were given at the end of the animated ad and some viewers might not have watched the whole thing. However, Powell says the point was to be more legitimate with youngsters about medications, keeping in mind the end goal to build up the believability of the Frank brand.

The Home Office says 67% of youngsters in a study said they would swing to Frank in the event that they required drug guidance. The Frank helpline received 225,892 calls and the website received 3,341,777 visits between 2011 and 2012. It's confirmed, it contends, that the method works.

But, we don't have any proofs that people have quit drug consumption because of Frank, just as we don't have such evidence in cases of other media campaigns against drugs.

Substance use in the United Kingdom has decreased by 9% in the ten years since the campaign was introduced, though the pros say a lot of this is because of a decline in the use of cannabis use, probably connected to younger people's changing attitudes towards smoking tobacco.


What Is Frank?

FRANK is a state drug education services together settled by the by the Department of Health and Home Office of the British government in 2003. FRANK's vision is to equip the youth with the bold facts and knowledge about the legal and illegal use of narcotics to reduce the drug use. A lot of media campaigns have been put out on both the radio and the internet.


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Services

FRANK has the following resources for anyone looking for information about drugs

  • A website
  • 24/7 anonymous telephone number
  • Email
  • A confidential live chat every day from 2 pm - 6 pm
  • A service to find treatment and counselling